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The world is a big place. So big in fact that even at the speed of light data can take a noticeable amount of time getting from one side of the planet to the other. And even though that time may only be seconds, as each data transaction between browser and web-server takes place, those seconds add up to a slower and lazier experience. When this laziness gets added together with other traffic between you and the website you are trying to view, the experience can become an intolerable one. If you own a website, this is a reality you probably live with even though you might not be aware of it. This is especially so if your site is hosted on any one of the many cheap plans offered by services such as GoDaddy and their many competitors. You are likely losing visitors because your website is slow. Especially when lots of visitors are looking for you.

About content delivery networks CDNs.Probably overlooked by most website owners, having a slow website is a potential disaster. Unless you don't really care if anyone sees your content, you'll likely be impacted at some point or another and won't likely be aware of it. Users will leave your website before you want them too, leaving unread pages and un-purchased products and services, all because someone got tired of waiting for your slow website. Bigger companies know this all too well. They have taken great measures to assure that visitors see their websites all the time and no matter where they are.

One great example of this is CNN, who invested in a content delivery network for CNN.com early on. On the morning of 9/11, as the horrible events transpired and the world became aware, suddenly millions of people went to the web for up to date information. That morning CNN.com was one of the few websites still online and delivering up to date content, albeit still in a handicapped form. No one could have forseen the vast increase in web traffic and user volume, except of course under such tragic circumstances as those.

So how did CNN do it? They had connected their global website to a content delivery network called Akamai. Akamai's CDN was keeping all that content up to date on their servers located all over the world. Instead of CNN's single site in Atlanta, they had local servers in major cities all over the globe delivering their content for them. This enabled CNN to scale from hundreds of users to millions of them without their own web servers becoming overloaded.

At one time, having a content delivery network for meant a big investment. Only companies with big internet budgets could afford the costs. But as with so many technologies, CDNs have no become affordable and available to the masses. In fact, some CDNs offer their basic services for free, at least for now. They see advantages for their paying clients to offer free services as well, as the additional data helps them fine-tune their networks for everyone. Empro has begun putting all our clients onto content delivery networks. The performance and security advantages are clear. We would be doing our clients a disservice NOT to recommend it.

Here are the top five reasons to use a CDN for your website...

  1. Better performance especially in peak periods.
  2. Better performance regardless of visitor locations.
  3. Better security. Prevent visits from known threats.
  4. Automatic scaling to meet audience size as needed.
  5. Features to protect content and add new functionality.

If you need help getting your website to perform the way you want it to, contact Empro today. We can help you get your website working the way it should and delivering the results you really want. We offer a free of charge evaluation to anyone who wants to get the most from the website.

 

About content delivery networks, CDNs and why you need one.

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